We are excited to announce a new class of paper in the journal: a Curated Collection, which is similar to an editorial for a Special Issue, but is instead based on our existing archive of papers that we have published in PRIMUS. The goal of a Curated Collection is to help identify connections between and among PRIMUS papers and to organize the PRIMUS archive for readers. Since not all of the big themes in the journal are represented in Special Issues, and some themes have continued to develop since the publication of a special issue, Curated Collections will help readers …

PRIMUS Announces new Curated CollectionsRead More »

The journal PRIMUS announces a special issue on resources for undergraduate cryptology. Stuart Boersma (Central Washington University), Chris Christensen (Northern Kentucky University), and Christian Millichap (Furman University) will guest edit the special issue. Description: Cryptology is an area that includes many topics and applications that are interesting and engaging for undergraduate mathematics majors. Additionally, cryptology also includes interesting and engaging topics that are accessible to non-mathematics majors. In increasing numbers, cryptology courses are being offered in mathematics departments. Sometimes these courses are being developed to support programs in mathematics, applied mathematics, and/or computer science. Sometimes these courses target non-math majors to fulfill …

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Resources for Undergraduate CryptologyRead More »

I believe that PRIMUS has a very supportive review and editorial process, perhaps even distinctively supportive, and I wanted to reflect briefly on how and why. First, what do I mean by supportive? As an editor, I regularly get notes about how thoughtful and helpful the reviewers’ comments were for authors, and the journal is full of examples of authors adding acknowledgements about how the feedback helped them strengthen their ideas. This stands in contrast with the tale of a paper getting contorted into some form of Frankenstein’s Monster in order to appease Reviewer #2. And as an author, I …

Reviewing for GrowthRead More »

One of the exciting elements of being the Communications Editor is that I get to connect people with the exciting papers in PRIMUS that I think will impact their professional work for the better. In support of this goal, Taylor & Francis allows us (Matt Boelkins, Kathy Weld, and me) to select papers each year as Editors’ Picks and makes them freely available for download to all without login, without requiring access to the journal. This blog post is intended to share a little about the categories of Picks and why I am excited about these particular papers. In general, …

Editors’ Picks 2021Read More »

Intro With the invention of smartphones has come a new genre of video games commonly referred to as “idle games”. Frankly, I love them. The term “idle” comes from the fact that most of these games are designed to progress regardless of whether the player is logged into them (or really, they just recompile based on time elapsed when you do log in). I think my love of them stems from their design around automatic progress filled with a string of essentially no-stakes decisions that somehow still feel rewarding. These games often feel overtly math-y, and, when they don’t, they …

Idle Math GamesRead More »

The comment I write most frequently as a reviewer or editor involves the word “traditional”. In most cases, I don’t think this word is doing what it needs to do, and in a lot of cases, I think it’s doing some harm. First, the term “traditional” doesn’t communicate anything about that tradition. Lots of authors contrast their pedagogical idea with an unspecified “traditional teaching”; others frame their pedagogical activity as being embedded in something more “traditional”. But this doesn’t mean anything unless the reader shares the same understanding of what is traditional and knows in detail about that tradition. Here’s …

Tradition(al)!Read More »

The journal PRIMUS (Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies) announces a special issue on developing the teaching capacity of early-career mathematics instructors. Jessica Deshler (West Virginia University) and Sarah Mayes-Tang (University of Toronto) will guest edit the special issue. An often-told anecdote among mathematicians is that of being handed a textbook and a class schedule, many times as they were just beginning graduate school, with the assumption that their years as a student would provide sufficient guidance in how to teach. Indeed, novice instructors usually teach in the way that they were taught. However, these ways of teaching are …

Call for Papers: Special Issue on developing the teaching capacity of early-career mathematics instructorsRead More »

Post by Matt Boelkins, Editor-in-Chief The purpose of this post is to offer some guidance for referees regarding what is most helpful to authors and editors in the review process, including how we interpret terms like “major revision”. At PRIMUS, we are invested in the overall project of helping students learn collegiate mathematics effectively; we do so through the articles we publish for our readers, who are primarily teachers of collegiate mathematics themselves.  As noted in our Aims and Scope, our focus is on pedagogical initiatives that range in scale of application from individual students and courses to curricula and …

What makes a good PRIMUS review?Read More »

One of the exciting elements of being the Communications Editor is that I get to connect people with the exciting papers in PRIMUS that I think will impact their professional work for the better. In support of this goal, Taylor & Francis allows us (Matt Boelkins, Kathy Weld, and me) to select papers each year as Editors’ Picks and makes them freely available for download to all without login, without requiring access to the journal. This blog post is intended to share a little about the categories of Picks and why I am excited about these particular papers. In general, …

Editors’ Picks 2020Read More »

The COVID-19 pandemic has shaken loose the cobwebs in all corners of the discussion about assessment in tertiary mathematics education. Faculty are being creative about assessments in new media, are being forced to acknowledge long-standing inequities and harm in the status quo, and are being given or are demanding the freedom to make changes that may have seemed impossible a year ago. While the pandemic has certainly been horrific, I hope that one silver lining of 2020 will be a permanent shift in our assessment practices as a community as well as a sustained openness to critiquing and revising our …

Curated Collection: AssessmentRead More »