One thing that was of great interest to the Editorial Board of PRIMUS at the last annual Board meeting (held at JMM in Denver in January 2020) was the geographical contrast between authorship and readership. Taylor & Francis is able to share some data on this for the interest of PRIMUS readers. Submissions since the beginning of 2017 have shown that the authorship of PRIMUS is very heavily based in the USA. The following map shows submitting countries, with darker weighting showing higher submission numbers: This pattern is even more pronounced when looking at this data in chart form (specific …

Who publishes in PRIMUS and who reads it?Read More »

There are SO MANY RESOURCES floating around. This page is my attempt to get them all in one place so that individual faculty don’t have to hope they’re on the right lists or reading the right Twitter threads. PLEASE, PLEASE comment or send me things to add to this page. I am confident that this post represents a small fraction of the ideas I’ve read in the last two weeks. Webinars and overviews: Rick Cleary, Ray Levy, and Mike Weimerskirch gave a (recorded) panel on “Active Learning Online” in the Electronic Seminar in Mathematics Education. This link includes several other …

Organized Resources for Teaching in this PandemicRead More »

This blog post expresses the wisdom of two colleagues who are thinking about the challenges of suddenly teaching with the online meeting technology Zoom. First, Steve Klee, an associate professor at Seattle University, shares his recent experiences transitioning suddenly to teaching with Zoom and wanting to maintain small group work. Then Anne Ho offers a checklist for faculty ramping-up to using Zoom derived from her experiences as chair of the (online) masters of mathematics program at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. While the content of this blog post is not directly connected to PRIMUS, we are confident that these …

Suddenly Teaching with Zoom?Read More »

Lots of faculty are being asked to re-imagine courses in the middle of a term to allow for completely remote learning. As other have pointed out, this is not the same thing as designing an online course, let alone developing the expertise to teach in a radically different medium suddenly, so we should expect less out of the results. Personally, I think we should allow students to get “credit” for courses up to this point but to be able to walk away from the rest without penalty (interpreted broadly), in order to preserve their health and to respect the fact …

Resources as you suddenly convert a course to a remote formatRead More »

One of the exciting elements of being the Communications Editor is that I get to connect people with the exciting papers in PRIMUS that I think will impact their professional work for the better. In support of this goal, Taylor & Francis allows us (Jo Ellis-Monaghan, Matt Boelkins, and me) to select 5 papers each year as Editors’ Picks and makes them freely available for download to all without login, without requiring access to the journal. This blog post is intended to share a little about the 5 categories of Picks and why I am excited about these particular papers. …

Editors’ Picks 2019Read More »

I am honored and excited to be the first Communications Editor for PRIMUS: Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies! I run this site and our social media presence, but I am also involved in the general editorial work of the journal, and I’m really passionate about this journal being a place to support ever increasing quality of discussions among mathematicians and educators about collegiate teaching and learning of mathematics and the surrounding systems and communities. If you have any thoughts or questions, you can find contact information for the our board and editors by following the link to …

Hello World!Read More »